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2012-2013 PROGRAMS

PCTS Annual Lecturer:
Ignacio Cirac
Max-Planck Institute for Quantum Optics, Garching
4-7 March 2013
Schedule of Events

PRINCIPAL PROGRAMS:

Bridging the Gap Between the Geosciences and Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science
October 1-2, 2012

Entanglement in Discrete and Continuous Quantum Systems
October 25-26, 2012

Higgs Physics After Discovery Seminar Series

Nonequilibrium Physics with Strongly Interacting Matter and Light Seminar Series

Through the Looking Glass
December 3-5, 2012

Origins of Life
Janaury 21-24, 2013

Geostrophic Turbulence and Active Tracer Transport in 2 Dimensions
March 13-15, 2013

Stability, Energetics, and Turbulent Transport in Astrophysical, Fusion, and Solar Plasmas
April 8-12, 2013

Higgs Physics After Discovery
April 25-26, 2013

Revealing Radiative Process Near Black Holes
May 1-3, 2013

Cosmology in the PLANCK Era
June 6-7, 2013

and more to come

 

   

PROGRAMS 2012-13:

Bridging the Gap Between the Geosciences and Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science
1-2 October 2012

Workshop Organizer: Frederick Simons

The purpose of this meeting is to bring together theoretical Geoscientists, Mathematicians, Statisticians and Computer Scientists around the common goal of identifying and solving challenging problems in the Geosciences. The focus will be on gathering a group of Principal Investigators to spearhead a proposal to the National Science Foundation, but all interested are welcome to attend the talks and discussions.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM AND REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Space is limited, however, any interested parties should register to attend the public talks. Please contact Frederik Simons at fjsimons@alum.mit.edu for information about the program or Dawn Reading at reading@princeton.edu on how to register.


Entanglement in Discrete and Continuous Quantum Systems
25-26 October 2012

Workshop Organizers: Andrei Bernevig, Duncan Haldane, Igor Klebanov, Joseph Maciejko, Tatsuma Nishioka, Masahito Yamazaki

The aim of this workshop is to bring together condensed matter and high-energy theorists to discuss exciting recent developments in the study of entanglement in quantum many-body systems and field theories. The topics to be covered include entanglement and Rényi entropies, topological entanglement entropy, entanglement spectrum, quantum information, renormalized entanglement entropy, c- and F-theorem, and holographic duality. This is a field where recent efforts by high-energy and condensed matter physicists have been overlapping, and we expect the workshop to stimulate new interdisciplinary discussions and collaborations.

PROGRAM AND REGISTRATION INFORMATION

CONFERENCE SLIDES


Nonequilibrium Physics with Strongly Interacting Matter and Light
Seminar Series

Program Organizers: Andrew Houck, David Huse, Marco Schiro, Hakan Tureci

SEMINARS

___________________________________________________________________________

Through the Looking-glass: a Glimpse into the Geometry and Topology of Materials
3-5 December 2012

Program Organizers: Elisabetta Matsumoto and Christian Santangelo

Geometry and topology govern many of the physical, biological and material properties of everyday objects. Complexity often arises from simple interactions in systems living in nontrivial geometries or topologies. This interdisciplinary workshop aims to unite mathematicians, physicists, biologists and engineers sharing common interest in applied geometry and topology. Our goal is both to further develop the use of geometry to understand materials and introduce topology into the conversation. Topics include topological defects in condensed matter and complex materials, physics on curved surfaces, knots, braids and nets in physics and biology, and persistent homology as a technique to identify topological structure in data.

PROGRAM AND REGISTRATION INFORMATION


Origins of Life
21-24 January 2013

Program Organizers: Laura Landweber (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology); Aaron Goldman (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology); Adam Burrows (Astrophysical Sciences and PCTS); Chris Chyba (Astrophysical Sciences and the Woodrow Wilson School); Ed Turner (Astrophysical Sciences); Jeremy Kasdin (MAE); Tullis Onstott (Geosciences); Michael Hecht (Chemistry)

The last few decades have witnessed the burgeoning of many highly productive lines of investigation into abiogenesis and the early emergence of biological complexity.  Planetary sciences and geochemistry have produced a short-list of well-studied settings where prebiotic chemistry may have led to the transition from non-living to living matter.  Major advances in abiotic syntheses of important biomolecules have resulted in an improved understanding of the relative availabilities of proto-biomolecules.  The continuing growth of bioinformatics databases has given computational biologists an unprecedented ability to reconstruct the properties of early organisms and ancient evolutionary histories.  Synthetic biology now allows investigators to examine the boundaries of life's genetic systems and minimal life in the laboratory.  In general, the advance of astrobiology has expanded our understanding of habitability and life as cosmological phenomena.  This workshop will integrate these themes, foster new local, national and international collaborations, and actively encourage scientists from within and outside the Princeton community to pursue studies of life's origins.  The workshop program will bring together researchers in these disparate subjects and subfields to address the questions of life's origins in the astronomical, chemical, genetic, evolutionary, and information-theoretic contexts.

Links to the archived talks are now available here.

PROGRAM AND REGISTRATION INFORMATION

PUBLIC LECTURE ON JANUARY 22, 2013: "IS THE EARTH RARE?" by James Kasting, PSU

To watch a live stream of the conference click on the link http://connect.arc.nasa.gov/ool2013


PCTS Annual Lecturer
4-7 March 2013

Professor Ignacio Cirac, Director of the Theory Division,Max-Planck Institute for Quantum Optics, Garching

Schedule of Events


Geostrophic turbulence and active tracer transport in 2 dimensions
13-15 March 2013

Program Organizers: Peter Constantin, Isaac Held and William Young

Many idealized models of atmospheric and oceanic flows reduce to the two-dimensional (2D) advection of a tracer that in turn determines the flow field. The classic example is non-divergent 2D flow on a plane (or a sphere), where the tracer is the vertical (or radial) component of the vorticity. Of special interest is the "geostrophic trubulence" generated in systems with two interacting active tracers, representing flow at the tropopause and the earth’s surface in the simplest atmospheric case.  Another example of special interest is surface quasi-geostrophic (SQG) flow, in which the state of the system is completely determined by the temperature at the surface. SQG flows bear some formal resemblance to 3D incompressible flows – for example, dimensional arguments suggest a -5/3 kinetic energy spectrum for the direct turbulent cascade to small scales, just as in 3D. SQG has developed into a model problem for those interested in singularity formation in 3D Euler or Navier-Stokes. The possible formation of singularities in SQG remains unsolved. There is also interest in possible blow-up of active scalar equations with more singular constitutive laws and in questions relating to long time behavior in the limit of small dissipative mechanisms. Our goal in this interdisciplinary workshop is to familiarize mathematicians and atmosphere/ocean scientists  with ongoing research outside of their fields, and possibly fertilize new work within both groups. 

PROGRAM AND REGISTRATION INFORMATION


Stability, Energetics, and Turbulent Transport in Astrophysical, Fusion, and Solar Plasmas: Unifying Theoretical and Computational Tools
8-12 April 2013

Program Organizers: Matthew Kunz (Chair), Jeremy Goodman, Greg Hammett, Hantao Ji, Stewart Prager, Alex Schekochihin, Anatoly Spitkovsky, Jim Stone

The principal goal of this workshop is to successfully disseminate research strategies across multiple platforms of plasma physics aimed at acquiring a better understanding of stability, energetics, and turbulent transport in astrophysical, fusion, and solar plasmas. While there are several inherent differences in astrophysical, fusion, and solar plasmas, many of the emergent phenomena and the techniques employed to study them display remarkable universality. Despite this universality, many techniques and approaches have yet to permeate all sub-fields of plasma physics. Accordingly, this workshop's focus is on sharing resources and investigational expertise, rather than solely on results. Speakers will identify and accentuate areas of common ground and use these "common-ground" parts of their own research as launching points to stimulate vigorous discussion, provoke interdisciplinary collaboration, and encourage a wider practice of analytical, numerical, and experimental techniques that are commonplace in one sub-field but not in another. If broadly and cooperatively applied, these techniques could lead to advancements in our understanding of, e.g., magnetorotationally driven turbulence in accretion disks; shear-flow suppression of turbulent transport and generation of transport barriers in tokamaks; subcritical transitions to instability in accretion disks and fusion devices; small-scale plasma instabilities in the solar wind, galaxy clusters, and hot accretion flows; particle heating in astrophysical plasmas and the solar wind; and, nonlocality, anisotropy, and mesoscale structure in turbulent flows.

Links to the archived talks are now available at this link http://www.astro.princeton.edu/~kunz/Site/Plasmas/Welcome.html

HOTEL AND PROGRAM INFORMATION


Higgs Physics After Discovery
Program Organizers: Nathaniel Craig (IAS/Rutgers), Sue Ann Koay (Princeton), Mariangela Lisanti (PCTS)

In light of the LHC's recent discovery of a Higgs-like particle, it is of critical importance to characterize the properties of this new particle and  understand its implications for new physics.  Close collaboration between theorists and experimentalists will be of paramount importance during this period, as information garnered in Higgs searches may be rapidly used to characterize the Higgs sector and develop new measurements to refine our understanding of the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking.  The primary purpose of this program is to foster increased communication about Higgs-related developments at the LHC between experimentalists and theorists at local institutions through a seminar series and two-day workshop.

Higgs Physics After Discovery Seminar Series:
3 October 2012 - "Higgs + X" - Andy Haas, NYU
26 November 2012 - "
Updated Higgs Results from the HCP Symposium " - Christoph Paus, MIT
18 March 2013 - "The Higgs Boson like properties as measured by the ATLAS detector at the LHC" - Eilam Gross, The Weizmann Institute of Science and CERN

Higgs Physics After Discovery Conference: 25-26 April 2013
PROGRAM AND REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Conference talks may be viewed by clicking on this link
:
http://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?ovw=True&confId=248303


Revealing Radiative Processes Near Black Holes
1-3 May 2013

Program Organizers: Adam Burrows, Joshua Dolence, Anatoly Spitkovsky, James Stone, Alexdander Tchekhovskoy and Avery Broderick (Perimeter Institute)

A confluence of developments in theoretical and observational techniques has recently enabled the study of the dynamics and properties of emission regions near black holes in unprecedented detail.  This workshop brings together experts in modeling black hole accretion, jets, and their radiation to constrain the physics of matter under extreme conditions -- near event horizons of black holes.

PROGRAM AND REGISTRATION INFORMATION


Cosmology in the Planck Era
6-7 June 2013

REGISTER HAS REACHED FULL CAPACITY AND IS NOW CLOSED.

Program Organizers: Aurelien Fraisse and William C. Jones

"The first cosmological release from the Planck mission has provided the community with an unprecedented wealth of cosmological and astrophysical information on a wide range of angular scales.  Although this meeting will include review talks on some of these results, its main goal is to discuss what can be done with the now publicly available data.  We will also discuss the new science opportunities that arise from combining the Planck data with upcoming data sets from current and future CMB polarization experiments.

The meeting will be divided in four sessions:
- Planck implications for inflation / the early Universe,
- Planck implications for SZ physics,
- Planck and the large-scale structure of the Universe, and
- CMB polarization on small and large scales.
A strong emphasis will be placed on discussions, which will be fueled by both invited and contributed talks.


PROGRAM


2012-13 PAST PROGRAMS at PCTS HERE

2011-12 PAST PROGRAMS at PCTS HERE

2010-11 PAST PROGRAMS at PCTS HERE

2009-10 PAST PROGRAMS at PCTS HERE

2008-9 PAST PROGRAMS at PCTS HERE

2007-8 FIRST PROGRAMS AT PCTS (click here)